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Ruben Cardenas Cardenas itibaren Southport, Southport, Merseyside PR9 0NR, İngiltere itibaren Southport, Southport, Merseyside PR9 0NR, İngiltere

Okuyucu Ruben Cardenas Cardenas itibaren Southport, Southport, Merseyside PR9 0NR, İngiltere

Ruben Cardenas Cardenas itibaren Southport, Southport, Merseyside PR9 0NR, İngiltere

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So, I'm going to take a stab at this...before I get too busy and before I forget what I've read -- and thought. (I've already moved on to another book...;-) Overall, I thought this was a masterful piece of work - and realized this on the first page. I've glimpsed around a little bit on the internet and know that J.S. has received some criticism for this book (along with praise, too), but I didn't look too closely because I wanted my thoughts to be my own. I definitely saw/heard some pretty laudatory reviews though, and therefore I had pretty high expectations for this book. Needless to say, it didn't let me down. Don't get me wrong, there were points when I wondered, "Why is this book considered to be great?" and "Where is this going?" and "What does this mean?" But as I went along with it, I fell in love with it. I guess partly because it did make me think those things, and those things - and the way they were written - made me want to keep reading. (As simple as it may sound, this is always a basic sign of a good book, in my opinion, as there have been many that I have started and not gone back to.) I will admit it was not always an easy book to read; not a fluffy book that you could pick up here and there. I felt like I had to really prepare myself and focus for when I was going to read this, which is largely what kept me from getting it read on time. So what did I like about it? J.S.'s keen insight into characters, people, families and their motivations. The people were very real, and developed, and flawed, and multi-dimensional. Cathy/Kate is probably the best evil character that I have ever encountered who was human (yet inhuman?). And how could anyone not be sad when the great Sam Hamilton died? You mourned him along with the other characters who mourned him. And then of course, the writing. Very accessible writing, and for the most part, it kept things moving along (although I know some feel/felt it was bit bogged down with description in some places). However, as things would be moving along, there would be a profound observation dropped into an ordinary paragraph, seamlessly and poetically, and yet without seeming overbearing. For example, on page 530: "One thing late or early can disrupt everything around it, and the disturbance runs outward in bands like the waves from a dropped stone in a quiet pool." These gems were all over the place - you could mine the book for them and be rich. So overall, here is my summary: amazing, scary, powerful, direct. It reaches to the core of what people are really like. P. S. Thought the historical background info was educational, too. ;-) P.P.S. Even though I thought this book was really great, I'm getting into my old fashioned teacher / critical mode: I am reserving 5 stars for excellence beyond compare. If I could give this book a decimal rating, it would probably be about a 4.5, or on a letter grade scale, perhaps a A-. A+ and 5 stars is heaven at this point - attaining the unattainable. Looking back at my earlier reviews, and the my distribution of 5 star accolades, this seems unfair. Perhaps I'm getting stauncher in my reviews? Perhaps, it's because there was such truthful telling of real evil that exists in most of us in this book that it taints my scoring of it? Hmmmm. Another good sign of a good, perplexing book. But my vote remains. For whatever reason, it feels right.

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Eeeee Eee Eeee gets better than it starts. it starts with the reputed tao or the expected tao lin, which is a kinduv updated beavis-&-butthead routine. constant defensive mockery coupled with surreal episodes that function as escape chutes out of narratives that have veered too close to actual confession. ...a dead-on description of a painful and common moment of (contemporary?) early adulthood: boredom and angst and suicide... "how do you have fun?" is the book's repeated question. a familiar topic but covered uniquely and with honesty. funny. then, thankfully, the book is smart and/or lazy enough to switch techniques. the episodes with bears and dolphins get deeper and become less cartoons than multi-reflecting max ernst figures. it begins to risk actual characterization and its longer sentences, seeming at first ironically used, eventually are permitted to speak sincerely. the briefly appearing Jan is a heartbreaker. throughout is a sortuv nihilistic worldview that refuses to be pinned down or admit that a full articulation is possible but which is interesting for its defiance. (the poems of his i read were better, or, maybe his style better succeeds with that form... why? maybe the length of the novel reveals the style's flaws more because it's harder to sustain and his line is more prosaic than musical?...) __________________ just begun this book last night... a beautiful provocateur and sometimes asshole... an effective and unique writer... curious about this one... from this bookslut interview: http://www.bookslut.com/features/2007... Q:I'd like to shift it a little to something I'm not sure you've been asked about before. What was it like to grow up Asian-American in this country? A new book called American-Born Chinese makes it out to be very hard. A:I'm glad you asked that question. It wasn't very hard at all. I think one person called me a "chink" in about 20 years. It was the person everyone called a “redneck.” There were like 10-15 Asians in my school of about 2000. It wasn't hard. I grew up in Florida. I want to say something else. In Eeeee Eee Eeee the main character's parents were born in Germany. His name is Andrew. In earlier drafts Andrew's parents were from Taiwan. I did Microsoft find-and-replace and changed Andrew to Klaus one day, because I thought Andrew was too long. I wanted a one-syllable name. I think that was the reason. Then I changed Taiwan to Germany and Shanghai to Berlin, since people named Klaus are usually from Germany. Then I didn't like the name Klaus and I changed it back to Andrew. I want ideally in my fiction to edit race and name in the same way I might move or delete a comma -- in order to better communicate how existential facts manifest in conscious human beings, so that the reader can look at the sentences and read them and then feel emotions.

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Meh-I didn't love the book, and I can't quite figure out why. It may just not have been the right book for me at the right time. It was a well written,vivid portrayal of life during the civil war, highlighting what the opportunities (or lack their of) that were available for women at the time. It also included lots of interesting information about the state of medicine at the time. The book received a star review from SLJ, Booklist, and even Kirkus--so just because I didn't love it doesn't mean that it's not a good book. I wouldn't hesitate to put it on a historical fiction bib--I think it's a good recommendation for middle school students--I think anyone much younger then that would be confused by all of the medical and scientific vocabulary that is included.