andrefernandez

Ricardo Fernandez Fernandez itibaren Texas itibaren Texas

Okuyucu Ricardo Fernandez Fernandez itibaren Texas

Ricardo Fernandez Fernandez itibaren Texas

andrefernandez

This is a good, but a little short, series to read.

andrefernandez

I've read it three times and consider it to be one of my favorites, even though I hate how everyone on the planet gushes over it. I'm not the romantic movie/film type, and I still think its brilliant.

andrefernandez

The author, while remaining somewhat "objective" and focused on statistics of land and wealth distribution, ultimately states his opinion towards the end of the book: that the European colonizers of Algeria were a reactionary bunch whose resistance to any reform of the apartheid-like system was the primary cause of the nationalist revolution and their consequent expulsion from Algeria. Good thesis. This book was my first introduction to Algerian history, and I did learn a great deal, especially about the initial conquering (1830) of Algeria by France, and subsequent colonization of the country. The book then goes through the economic changes and changes in the rural landscape - particularly the transition from peasant agriculture to increasingly large, export-oriented farms. The focus is a bit heavy on government policy, and a bit lacking in daily conditions of life. He also describes development of a more assimilationist civil rights movement among the Algerian elite, and when this movement is completely rejected, the development of nationalist groups demanding liberation from France. He then quickly discusses the various attacks and armed groups that comprised the Algerian revolution, and the several years in which various treaties were being negotiated as the fighting occurred. I was most surprised to learn about the governements that followed the revolution, Soviet style communism recently overthrown by Islamist movements. The book totally lacks any explanation of the differences between various Muslim groups in Algeria, and the splits and conflicts, and ultimate huge changes within them. Originally published in 1964, the book has the feel of an older history book, with exacting careful research, but without some of the helpful, and more recent developments in historical writing that have come about with subaltern and postcolonial studies.