florianstark

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Okuyucu Florian Stark Stark itibaren Texas

Florian Stark Stark itibaren Texas

florianstark

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florianstark

Even in college, I was not into philosophy. So when I picked this book up and realized that it is straight up philosophy, I was at first tempted to dismiss it. However, I decided to give it a try. Although I am not now a philosopher, it was worth the time. The book is written in very short vignettes, organized into five causes and five solutions. It is, as the title suggests, an exploration into the unhappiness and arbitrariness of the quest for status. I found the exploration of status through the ages quite compelling, illustrating that status is not static, and that its pursuit is rather futile in the long run. The two final sections of the book are "Religion" and "Bohemia," which gave a slight negative color to the experience for me. The religion section was disappointingly Christian, and based on doctrine more honored in the breach than the observance. The Bohemia section I just didn't have patience for. Neither he nor Jack Kerouac seem to get the irony of Kerouac's statement, quoted on p 270-273 that it is better to be a free spirit, bum, poet, beat, or artist who become "sons of the road and watch the freight trains pass, take in the immensity of the sky and feel the weight of ancestral America." Well, if nobody is willing to work, there will be no freight trains to watch. Bohemians depend on *somebody* doing actual work to produce food and shelter and warmth. To his credit, de Botton acknowledged this conundrum, and that the whole Bohemia thing can be irritating, but urged the reader to take lessons where they can be found, which is fair. It was interesting to venture outside my comfort zone, though I can't say the book changed my life.