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Stas Bogatin Bogatin itibaren Kharogla, Himachal Pradesh, Hindistan itibaren Kharogla, Himachal Pradesh, Hindistan

Okuyucu Stas Bogatin Bogatin itibaren Kharogla, Himachal Pradesh, Hindistan

Stas Bogatin Bogatin itibaren Kharogla, Himachal Pradesh, Hindistan

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Kalbim yaylalarda, kalbim burada değil, kalbim yaylalarda geyiği kovalar, A-vahşi geyiği kovalar ve karayı takip eder - kalbim yaylalarda, nereye gidersem gideyim! Yaylalara veda, Kuzeye veda, Cesaretin doğduğu yer, değerli ülke! Nereye gidersem gideyim, nereye gidersem gideyim, Dağlık Tepeler hiç sevmediğim için. Yüksek karla kaplı dağlara veda, Aşağıdaki suşlara ve yeşil vadilere veda, Ormanlara ve vahşi asılı ormanlara veda, Sellere ve sesli dökülen sellere veda! Kalbim yaylalarda, kalbim burada değil, kalbim yaylalarda geyiği kovalar, A-vahşi geyiği kovalar ve karayı takip eder - kalbim yaylalarda, nereye gidersem gideyim!

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İskoç ve Maori eserleri üzerine bir örnek olay incelemesi ile emperyalizmin doğasında bulunan kültürel alışverişlere büyüleyici bir bakış.

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Gerçekten harika bir okuma. İlgi çekici bulacağınız hakkında hiçbir fikriniz olmayan bir konu hakkında size ton öğreten bu kitaplardan biri. Ne zaman birisinin bir televizyon şovunda mezar kaztığını gördüğümde (ne kadar ortaya çıkardığında şaşıracaksınız) yardım edemiyorum ama öğrendiklerimi bana en yakın olanla paylaşıyorum ...

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Bill Bryson, siyah ayılardan ne kadar korktuğundan bahsederken bile büyük bir mizahla yazıyor. Kitabı yüksek sesle okuyordum ve yaklaşık beş dakika boyunca o bölümden geçemedim, çok sert gülüyordum.

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bu iyi bir kitaptı! Nazi kitaplarından yemin ettiğim için biraz güvensizlik belirtiyorum. Ancak, zaten çok fazla hayat görmüş olan genç bir kızın zihninden yazılmış olan bu kitap, II. Dünya Savaşı ve Naziler ve Yahudiler, vb.

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كتاب رائع...خفيف...لطيف فيه حكم جميله احببته

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Another uneven anthology. I still have it in my hands, so I'll try to hit each story briefly. "Lucky" by Charlaine Harris - Sookie is much easier to take in short form. I can't help it, the woman grates on me (in the TV show even worse than in the books). The other characters keep me reading. "Bogieman" by Carole Nelson Douglas - Delilah Street does more than grate on my nerves in long form. She's more palatable in short form, too, but there are reminders of why I don't intend to read more in that series. "Looks are Deceiving" by Michael A. Stackpole - If I've read any of Stackpole's work before, it's been in anthologies, and I don't remember it. I did wonder if this short story is set in a universe he uses in longer works, though. It wasn't bad at all. "The House of Seven Spirits" by Sharon Shinn - I loved this story! And how often do you say that about a haunted house tale? I must track down and read some of Shinn's novels. Any suggestions? "Glamour" by Mike Doogan - The Peasantry Anti-Defamation League might be after Doogan if he isn't careful (at least, representatives of the male peasantry). The story was cute, and it did make me laugh. "Spellbound" by Donna Andrews - This is another author whose books are going on my (groaning) to-read shelf. The story hit a few clichés, but was fun enough to get away with them. "The Duh Vice" by Michael Armstrong - Ugh. A little too preachy, and way too much anti-fat prejudice. "Weight of the World" by John Straley - Where does Santa Claus go in the off-season? That's the biggest question answered in this piece. The "mystery" was "solved" nearly as soon as it was discovered. "Illumination" by Laura Anne Gilman - Bonnie's back story! I think a bit of this story is used in the first chapter of Gilman's first PUPI novel, but I'll know more when I get my hands on it. It's a must-read for fans of the Cosa Nostradamus universe, though. "The House" by Laurie R. King - could we maybe call a hiatus on the abused-kid stories? Maybe I'm hypersensitive, but I'm tired of them. "Appetite for Murder" by Simon R. Green - another dark Nightside story. I don't think I'll ever need to read more in that universe. "A Woman's Work" by Dana Stabenow - I'm an unabashed Stabenow fangirl. Despite that, I wasn't sure how she'd do in a fantasy setting. She proved herself, certainly. I can only hope that we'll see longer fantasy works from her in print at some juncture.

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I love Man vs. Wild and I knew that Bear Grylls had climbed Everest, but I had no idea he was such a good author as well. Every step, every challenge he faced on the summit, Bear does an incredible job to make you feel as if you are there. Fantastic read!

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This is one of those rare times that I think the movie version of the book would be better than the book itself. The Shadow of the Wind is an intricately woven tale of mystery involving a young boy who accidentaly finds the last remaining copy of a book with a tragic history and whose life begins to mirror the main character's life in the book. If you are a fan of mysteries (which I am not generally) you will probably LOVE this story. For me, however, many of the story's plot twists seem a bit contrived and convenient, i.e., the boy is led to a "cemetrary of lost books" that only a selected few people know about and conveniently finds this book among the millions that are hidden away in long corridors and mazes of hidden rooms. However, the book does manage to unveil layer upon layer of intrigue and connections all the while keeping up a fast pace. The storytelling itself is masterful and the language often haunting. Occasionally, I felt an akward phrasing which I chocked up to the difficulty of translation. And there are some incredibly rich characters (Fermin) which I could very easily imagine transferred to the big screen. I did enjoy the book but I could have easily abandoned it if I wasn't reading it for a book club. This is my second time reading this book (the last time was at least 10 years ago) and I definitely enjoyed it more this time around.