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Lea Tolpha Tolpha itibaren Esthur, Karnataka 562102, Hindistan itibaren Esthur, Karnataka 562102, Hindistan

Okuyucu Lea Tolpha Tolpha itibaren Esthur, Karnataka 562102, Hindistan

Lea Tolpha Tolpha itibaren Esthur, Karnataka 562102, Hindistan

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I am completely addicted to the VH1 shows "Celebrity Rehab" and it's spin-off, "Sober House." Not to mention I have been a Loveline fan for years, so when I was at the bookstore perusing and came across a book written by Dr. Drew I had to read it. A good portion of the book is basically Celeb Rehab in written form minus the celebrities. I guess addiction looks the same whether you are rich and famous or a broke nobody. What I found was interesting was the running commentary by Pinsky not only about the situations at hand from a medical standpoint, but also what was going on in his heart and head. On tv he portrays a calm demeanor, unaffected by the chaos and sadness his profession brings. In reality is deeply affected and doesn't always feel in control of the situation. It was an interesting perspective. I also liked how he went into his theories and biology behind addiction and why addicts just can't up and stop. Again, it was an interesting perspective. The only complaint I have is it's not the best written book. I know, I know. He's a doctor, not an author. But it's a "written-with" book, so I expect the writing to be of a tad higher caliber.

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I like the characters, I do. They change and develope. I also like how Flewelling will revisit things, too, like the death of Alec's father. Things aren't just swept under the rug and I appreciate that. I also appreciate how Seregil and Alec's relationship isn't the focus of the story that unfortunately happens too much in romance, especially homoerotica. The book is more dedicated to the story and in doing so, makes their relationship realistic and believable. The biggest complaint I have is making the villians, well, too villianous. There's no semblance of humanity in them. They hunt, torture, kill and do little else. I was really hoping that there would be much more depth in her villians because I appreciate The Antagonist and a strong antagonist makes a stronger protagonist. However, these were bad, bad men and their actions seemed over-the-top, like she was trying to convince her reader of how nefarious they truly were. I ached to see instances of weakness, and quiet contemplation. Maybe even a relationship (non-romantic) form between her two leading villians. But unfortunately they struck me as flat, and although terrifying, remained uninteresting. As a small note, Thero is becoming a fantastic character and I'm excited to see more of him in the next book.