midou313

Midou313 itibaren Nea Malgara 573 00, Yunanistan itibaren Nea Malgara 573 00, Yunanistan

Okuyucu Midou313 itibaren Nea Malgara 573 00, Yunanistan

Midou313 itibaren Nea Malgara 573 00, Yunanistan

midou313

Bu kitapta hayal kırıklığına uğradım. Soooo sıkıcıydı, zar zor bitirebildim. :-(

midou313

In the middle of the zombie apocalypse, Plato's Allegory of the Cave is summarized: "The thing about SMART mother truckers is that sometimes, they sound like CRAZY mother truckers to STUPID mother truckers..."

midou313

This was a wonderful book. Edmund de Waal tells the story of his family, from the late nineteenth century to the present, using a collection of netsuke (very small carved objects from Japan)which are passed down from one member of the family to another, as the connecting link between different parts of the story. I have to say it started slowly, and I wasn't as interested when the narrative focused on the first collector in France during the Impressionist period, because it seemed to be so entirely about art collecting and felt a bit distanced from the characters. When the scene shifted to fin-de-siecle Vienna,I was instantly caught up in it, however, as the focus broadened and the author cast his net more widely in terms of people and history and culture. I was interested in the way in which such an assimilated Jewish family navigated the stormy seas of this time period. Though I have to say I wondered at the lack of information about their actual religious lives. Were they so assimilated that they just didn't connect to their Judaism except in terms of their social world? I'm guessing this was the case. As we moved into World War I and II it became even more compelling, especially the account of how this fabulously rich family's personal lives and financial empire crumbled as Nazism took hold. At this point the characters, always a bit distant, became real and terribly sympathetic to me, particularly the maid, Ana, and the daughter of the family, Elizabeth, who becomes a lawyer and a fiercely independent woman. I especially loved the story of his Uncle Iggy who moves to Japan after the war and makes a long-term commitment to a Japanese man named Jiro: their story felt really touching, perhaps because the author knew and loved them both. Definitely a lovely and original family portrait.