hs4mindia

H S S itibaren Böbingen an der Rems, Almanya itibaren Böbingen an der Rems, Almanya

Okuyucu H S S itibaren Böbingen an der Rems, Almanya

H S S itibaren Böbingen an der Rems, Almanya

hs4mindia

** spoiler alert ** Scary scary scary! Despite not loving Look At Me, I thought I would give this one a try. And so far, I quite like it, though it scares the bejesus out of me (I'm just about done). The reappearance towards the end of the same terrifying experience at the beginning -- trapped in an enclosed space and being left to die was completely eerie, but I found the scariest thing to be the overlapping stories. I loved Mick...and then not so much. I really like some of the details of this one -- especially Danny's super sensitivity to wifi. Some of the metaphors are a bit too obvious (being cut off from communication/being trapped in the cave/keep), but by and large I think this would be a recommendation!

hs4mindia

Depression: more complicated than the Lexapro ads would have you believe. An intelligent and very thorough interdisciplinary introduction, but with a publication date of 2002, it hews pretty close to the serotonin-oriented theories of depression (although Solomon does a nice job of explaining how very little is known about how Prozac-generation antidepressants actually work, even though they clearly DO work). Since then, medical research has gone on to explore models of depression that explore the role of early and repeated stressors -- models with similarities to post-traumatic stress disorder that explore the role of chemicals like adrenaline in depression. None of that is in this book. Still, Solomon's work on the social contexts of depression is what makes this worth reading. Solomon is at his best when he puts religious notions of the sins of accedia and sloth, and puritan ethics of hard work, careful forethought and stoicism together with the puzzle of a "brain disease" that would render someone incapable of adhering to those standards. NB: if you're currently experiencing depression, this is not the book for you, both because of its density and because Solomon is drawn to cases of idiomatic or treatment-resistant depression, meaning that the prognosis for depression winds up looking a bit bleaker than it is for the general population.