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Kevin Ramoo Ramoo itibaren Sarai, Gujarat, Hindistan itibaren Sarai, Gujarat, Hindistan

Okuyucu Kevin Ramoo Ramoo itibaren Sarai, Gujarat, Hindistan

Kevin Ramoo Ramoo itibaren Sarai, Gujarat, Hindistan

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Abigail Wendover, or Abby as she prefers to be called, considers herself quite off the market at the ripe old age of 28. Her main concern is not marriage, but seeing that her young niece and ward Fanny has a proper coming-out. Fanny, unfortunately, has fallen in love with the odious fortune-hunter Stacy Caverleigh and a scandalous elopement is a distinct possibility. A further complication arrives with the return of Stacy’s uncle, Miles Caverleigh, from India. Miles has a scandalous past of his own, is cavalier about propriety, and has no interest in helping Abby break up her niece and his nephew. He is, however, very interested in Abby, and Abby, to her dismay, finds Miles very interesting, too. What is a proper young lady to do? Black Sheep is a Regency romance of the first stare. I admit, at first I feared it would turn out to be a dead bore, but then, the unconventional and impudent (scandalous and improper) Miles made his appearance and the story really began to shine. His chemistry with Abby was delightful. Their conversations were most diverting. It was only when the two were apart that the story dragged somewhat, and only then because I, as a reader, so missed their interactions. Only a pompous lobcock (or a chucklehead or wet-goose) could fail to enjoy this novel.* * If you couldn’t tell, I quite enjoyed the language. (Did people really talk that way?) I’m just biding my time, awaiting the perfect opportunity to toss “as cross as crabs” or “shatterbrained” into a conversation.

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Emma is the tale of a young lady who seems both oblivious to the effects of her actions and yet feels that she is a personage with great influence on her neighbors. This is my least favorite Jane Austen work so far. I found Emma Woodhouse to be a fairly unsympathetic character, and never quite warmed to her. The plot dragged until the last 70 pages or so, and I wasn't entirely convinced that it had been worth my trouble to get to the final interesting portion. This book's primary value is as part of Jane Austen's collection, but I would not go so far as to recommend that someone read it. Choose Sense and Sensibility, Mansfield Park, or Pride and Prejudice instead -- they are far more enjoyable.